No, Not Boring.

No need to die of boredom in the new South Africa, even though current shenanigans are similarly messy as 25-30 years ago, not much different in terms of people killing opponents or rivals, in towns or villages. We have heavily armed troops and thousands of police deployed to keep the people from attacking state offices, […]

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No need to die of boredom in the new South Africa, even though current shenanigans are similarly messy as 25-30 years ago, not much different in terms of people killing opponents or rivals, in towns or villages. We have heavily armed troops and thousands of police deployed to keep the people from attacking state offices, and we have diplomats trying to tell the world that we are a great place to do business. So much has not improved or changed, so many official lies, and many riotous protests because things haven’t changed. But it isn’t boring, no sir!

Who could be bored when armored troop carriers crawl through a major capital city when there isn’t an invading military force anywhere to be found, just citizens going about their normal lives? It seems the Government is nervous of ordinary citizens and members of other political parties.

Who could be bored when citizens burn houses in another major city because they are pissed off with the resident criminals doing their illegal stuff in the neighborhood, year after year, about which the police do nothing, despite citizens requests and complaints?

Who could be bored when a president and his chums seem hell-bent on chucking out the people looking after the Treasury, or putting sycophants into positions of authority in the revenue services, or prosecutions authority, all of which is done to clear the way to plunder the state coffers? Nothing boring about this.

There was a lot very wrong, even immoral and criminal, about how this country was governed before the advent of the new South Africa. There is a lot very wrong, criminal and immoral about how this country is being run now. Guns, soldiers, riot police, riots, patchy and dis-empowering education, all rather much as 25-35- 45 years ago. No, not boring but frighteningly disconcerting.

No, Not Boring.

No need to die of boredom in the new South Africa, even though current shenanigans are similarly messy as 25-30 years ago, not much different in terms of people killing opponents or rivals, in towns or villages. We have heavily armed troops and thousands of police deployed to keep the people from attacking state offices, and we have diplomats trying to tell the world that we are a great place to do business. So much has not improved or changed, so many official lies, and many riotous protests because things haven’t changed. But it isn’t boring, no sir!

Who could be bored when armored troop carriers crawl through a major capital city when there isn’t an invading military force anywhere to be found, just citizens going about their normal lives? It seems the Government is nervous of ordinary citizens and members of other political parties.

Who could be bored when citizens burn houses in another major city because they are pissed off with the resident criminals doing their illegal stuff in the neighborhood, year after year, about which the police do nothing, despite citizens requests and complaints?

Who could be bored when a president and his chums seem hell-bent on chucking out the people looking after the Treasury, or putting sycophants into positions of authority in the revenue services, or prosecutions authority, all of which is done to clear the way to plunder the state coffers? Nothing boring about this.

There was a lot very wrong, even immoral and criminal, about how this country was governed before the advent of the new South Africa. There is a lot very wrong, criminal and immoral about how this country is being run now. Guns, soldiers, riot police, riots, patchy and dis-empowering education, all rather much as 25-35- 45 years ago. No, not boring but frighteningly disconcerting.

 

SA Govt Took R1.0699 Trillion.

This massive sum is what private persons and business handed over to the SA govt in 2015-16.( SARS announcement, Pretoria, 1 April 2016) Did you ever try to imagine how much that is? Every cent that govt has, it took from private persons or businesses. Every cent spent by govt on anything, at what-ever level, was provided by the people. The govt gave none of its own, because it has nothing except what it takes from us.

This is some of what was added to the govt’s stash reported in April 2016:- Personal Income Tax-R389.3 billion, Corporate Income Tax-R193.5 billion, VAT R280.8 billion, Customs/Excise R151,8 billion, and so on.

In the next 3 years the govt plans to dish out R841.7 billion to education, all of which it plans to take from private people and businesses as part of the usual money gathering that govt does.

These last couple of days we have heard political leaders saying that the private sector must come forward to contribute to the education funds, that it has more money than the State, that it has R52 billion lying unused in the JSE, which should be diverted to pay students fees. Do these words spring from ignorance about who has been paying all the time, or do they come from ill-will, or maybe someone who is looking for some populist support?

 

 

Why do we need foreign capital today?

In the history of Africa, people came to collect wealth, to grab shares of the resources available here. Fortunes were assembled by traders, rubber plantation developers, colonists, settler-farmers, mining men and more. What has changed?

Why is it that today we hear our so-called leaders crying out for ‘capital inflow’? Why were those who came before, seeking fortunes, able to create piles of capital, able to build fortunes, but now we are dependent, it seems, on bringing capital in from outside. The resources are here. What is the problem, that we can no longer build fortunes from what is already here, without first bringing in fortunes of foreign capital?

 

 

Why Do We Keep Making Fools of Ourselves ?

The President of RSA chides the parliamentarians because they are making fools of themselves in the eyes of the world.Has he had a good look at his own performance in Parliament? Does he realize that the majority of those parliamentarians are from his party?

The citizens are burning schools and denying their children an education close to home. For what reason? Maybe they don’t like the new constituency demarcation in their area? Or because they want a tarred road? How many other reasons can they find to mess up their kids education?

Other citizens are burning commuter trains that their fellow man needs to go to his place of employment. Why?

People are drowning in useless boats, rushing to leave the failing lands of their birth. Why?

People professing to be of a caring religious persuasion are killing others who also profess to worship the same Creator.Why?

Looking at the madness in other parts of Africa, in Syria, in Turkey, in France, in fact all over the place, one must conclude that Modern Man has decided to go mad, all together, and fade from the scene, after the shortest of times ( say 200,000 years).

 

Remember This Date, It’s All Happening

It’s 16 March 2016 and “twitter” is steaming.

( A late note: the Deputy Finance Minister, Jonas, is coming out about being offered the ministers job, which he rejected, and thus made way for “Des”. It’s all happening today.)

FIFA letting the cat out about SA paying bribes for the 2010 World Cup rights.

The Presidents “memory” being blasted by an ex-ANC MP and once-senior member of the party.

Investigations and warnings against the reinstated Minister of Finance.

International rating agency digging into the financial stability of our country.

The SA currency going through the floorboards yet the Stock Exchange trotting along happily. Could it be connected- – our assets are deliciously cheap because of the currency crash?

The Courts finding that the government violated it’s obligations to the International Criminal Court and our own law… and so on.

Just remember this date, the middle of this week. I think we are at a watershed.

Changing Everything but Fixing Little

Two days ago, Andrew Donaldson suggests Tito wants to rename South Africa. I guess that’s not the first time we’ve heard something like that. Right this very week-end various players are rushing around in Tshwane/Pretoria re-changing street names. Towns, villages, cities and airports are renamed. We have Government Ministers being changed back, forward and sideways. We have changes to the Pensions Act and changes in newspaper ownership using government pension money. (I wonder if the Pension Act changes will free up some more money to change the media playing field a bit more).

The amount of enthusiasm displayed in changing these things is admirable. It suggests that, where really meaningful matters are involved, such as beefing up our passenger rail services, moving tonnes of water and fodder to where it is needed or shifting the State educational system into a higher gear, then we will see some amazingly impressive achievements. The thought and energy consumed in switching Ministers and fighting legal appeals suggests that when it comes to the big stuff, really moving the country forward, we would have produced a South Africa loaded with well educated young men and women, vast numbers of well-built houses, built by well trained new artisans. Water treatment plants and reticulation systems would surely be in the efficient and effective hands of well trained and motivated apprentices and journeymen. But no- !

Instead a ton of money is being spent on connected people trotting off to Davos this week, or some other jamboree next week, to tell the world what a great investment destination the New (Yet to renamed) South Africa is. Those who hear the stories may well ask why they should invest tonnes of money into a country that fails to manage it’s teachers, fails to select leaders who understand international money markets, and where the nest-egg they invested could loose 20% of its value overnight. Having new names for towns and streets does not match the persuasive power of up-to-date electricity systems, of a fully functional education system and law-abiding government and citizenry. And the sight of wasteful opulence as allowed or encouraged by the Parliamentary handbook on salaries and perks is telling an equally discouraging story.

What the world needs to see here is a citizenry voting for really knowledgeable people to govern the land and put the resources to work for all who live here.